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Old 06-07-2009, 12:17 PM   #1
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Adjusting Ohlins Shock

I have an Ohlins shock with a hydraulic preload adjuster. At present, I need to turn the preload adjuster almost all the way in to get the proper preload (i.e., correct sag). I'd like to have the preload adjuster mid-way through its adjustment range for the same preload.

My shock looks like the picture below. Can I remove the pin shown by the arrow and turn the adjusting collar to increase preload? That way, I can increase preload a bit with the collar and back off on the hydraulic adjuster. And how do I remove and reinsert the pin from the adjuster body (or will it just lift it out)? Thanks in advance ...
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Old 06-07-2009, 12:24 PM   #2
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You have to remove the spring.
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Old 06-07-2009, 12:44 PM   #3
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Are you sure (just asking again as I'm hoping there's an alternative)? Here's a picture of the shock. Given all the threads below the adjuster, it looks like there's room to move the adjuster further down the shock body.
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Old 06-07-2009, 03:26 PM   #4
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Naw not sure, I thought I read that. You might be able to by rotating the preload collar if the hose does not hit on anything. I think what I read was the shock has to come off the bike to do it.
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Old 06-07-2009, 04:43 PM   #5
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I have the same shock you can use a spanner wrench and turn the whole preload adjuster one compleate turn at a time, and orient the hose in the same place, no need to remove pin. You will need to remove the shock, about 1/2 hour job very easy. Remove right fairing, remove weight from swingarm, remove right side link only, and the two shock mount bolts, shock will slide right out the bottom. It is recomended that you remove the spring but you can turn the preload adjuster with the proper spanner.
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Old 06-08-2009, 08:02 AM   #6
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Ernie, Gixxerboy55 ... thanks!

One more question. Does the adjuster thread onto the shock body or does it just slide over the threads? In other words, is the collar above the shock the only part that threads onto the shock body? (It seems like the adjuster couldn't work if it was threaded onto the body since the pin that anchors it to the collar prevents it from spinning, which would prevent it from moving up and down if it were threaded onto the shock body)

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Old 06-08-2009, 11:23 AM   #7
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You might want to consider not putting the adjuster half way through it's travel at your ideal set point. I'd put the adjuster more towards the beginning of it's travel. When you think about it, what are the chances that you'll be soften up the preload that much? I don't know how much travel the adjuster provides, but I'd find your ideal preload setting for you and then set the system up so that your adjuster is only 1/4 of the way cranked. Maybe 1/3. That way you still have a little room to soften it up a little, but should you take a passenger, you'll have much more adjustability at that end.

Just a thought.
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Old 06-08-2009, 11:31 AM   #8
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Check out this Video by Dave Moss. It will help you to setup your suspension by properly adjust your shock and forks.

http://www.onthethrottle.com/content/view/73/40/
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Old 06-08-2009, 04:58 PM   #9
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The pin is there just to keep the hose oriented in the right position. I'am pretty sure the whole thing threads onto the body. I have switched springs a couple of times. did not actually see him do it. I was told you can turn it with the spring on but not recomended, since you want to tighten it, most likely you should take the spring off. pmed you
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Old 06-09-2009, 09:29 AM   #10
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I'm not sure which model Ohlins shock that is, but on the 46 (likely) and the ttx the preload adjuster does not thread onto the shock body.

You cannot safely remove the spring on that shock without a spring compressor. But all you need to remove the shock is a pair of jackstands under the footpeg/brackets and a 12mm and 14mm socket/t handles. A friend helps the first time you do it.
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Old 06-09-2009, 10:51 AM   #11
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Thanks for the info. It is a 46 shock body and I dug up the spring rate from some old emails I got from Ohlins: 160 N/mm or about 900 lbs/inch ... I'm definitely not going to be trying to remove the spring on my own.

The shock installed easily. Hopefully it will come out just as easily so that I can try to turn the adjusting collar.
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Old 06-09-2009, 11:01 AM   #12
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That's a massive spring - does your bike have an aftermarket link on it?
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Old 06-09-2009, 11:17 AM   #13
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It's the stock link. The bike is a '98 Triumph Sprint Executive. I had two choices from Ohlins, a TR319 with a 140 N/mm spring and a TR601 with a 160 N/mm spring. The TR601 matched the length of the original shock more closely and since I weigh about 200# and occasionally carry a passenger, I went with the heavier spring.

The Ohlins guy said the following in response to a question about link ratios: Basically you can say that the springrate tells you alot about the linkratio, on a progressiv link you can use a soft spring with alot of preload, on a more flat ratio you use a hard spring with less preload. The startratio of the link also comes in to play.
For damping: harder spring normally more rebound-damping and softer compressiondamping.
Soft spring: more compressiondamping and less rebound-damping.


So maybe the stock link on that bike has a fairly flat ratio?
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Old 06-09-2009, 11:48 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marcg View Post
So maybe the stock link on that bike has a fairly flat ratio?
Yes - surprising for a streetbike. I assumed you were setting up your GSX-R and someone replaced the stock link with an aftermarket link which is traditionally less progressive. Sounds like a fun project. Good luck!
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