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Old 09-24-2020, 03:51 PM   #31
Free_Bird
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The $900 Tune up estimate is a trap right now. Just be good with having the rear brakes sorted out.
Tune up right now? Add an injector/carb gas treatment this one time. The Sparkplugs will get cleaned, Carbs at peak performance and general fuel system cleaning.
Clean & lube Chain is a task the Rider should do. Bandit makes the job much easier using the Center Stand.
Using spray WD40 as a cleaner. Let dry and spray on your favorite chain lube.

You'll know by seeing how much Pad is left to determine if it needs replacement. If it does wait for a tire change to include new pads. Just pads not rotor or brake rebuild kit.

Sparkplugs are easy to access on a Naked bike. Careful the plugs are lightly tightened down. Same with the Oil drain plug, tight enough to hold it in place and no more. Check videos how it is explained.
Air filter and box clean is accessed by lifting the Tank. Tank is on a hinge, just one bolt holding it down. Check videos it is easy to do.


The estimate lists a Valve Adjustment. It is the major use of time in the Labor estimate.
Trap is the "Check and Replace if needed" in the estimate. These will increase the final bill amount by a lot.
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Old 09-24-2020, 04:42 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by cozy View Post
In my experience at least using this Bandit, it is totally false that the rear brake does or should only provide 5% of stopping power. Having now ridden with only a front brake to use for a short time, in no way is that a safe, practical & ideal way to ride.
It simply does not provide enough sensitive, reliable strong braking power to deal safely with all the random occurrences, obstacles, inattentive other drivers, etc that exist, and provide a safe space cushion so to speak. Especially if driving at freeway speeds. I managed it, but it was definitely with very modified, unideal riding.

Ive also read and heard the rear brake should provide around 30% of braking power, which in my experience is far more accurate to what is does and safely should contribute.
The 70 - 100 on the front is variable depending how hard you brake. And it's the same for the rear. 30% (approximately) down to zero percent if your braking really hard with the front.
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Old 09-24-2020, 04:45 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by ST Guy View Post
The 70 - 100 on the front is variable depending how hard you brake. And it's the same for the rear. 30% (approximately) down to zero percent if your braking really hard with the front.
makes sense
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Old 09-24-2020, 05:46 PM   #34
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So what was it that was making noise?

So did you find out from the shop what was installed wrong with your rear brake? The link below takes you to a Kawasaki rear brake diagram, not a Suzuki diagram. I am sure that a quick search you could find a Suzuki one. They are quite similar as most of them are sourced from the same suppliers, Showa or Nissin. 9 times out of 10, it is the pad spring ref diagram # 92145 or the GUIDE,BRACKET RETAINER ref # 13070. Pad spring is brass color and the bracket retainer guide is chrome color.

https://www.kawasakipartshouse.com/o...89c/rear-brake

Last edited by Hank Wong; 09-24-2020 at 05:48 PM..
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Old 09-25-2020, 06:51 AM   #35
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I always used both brakes, especially on a big bike. That way you're in the proper habit of using it. And I think that not using the rear brake is not a safe habit to get into.

However, yes the front brake is the most important. Depending upon how hard you're braking, it can be anywhere from 70% to 100% of your stopping power. But do NOT ignore the rear brake. That's the lazy man's approach to braking.
That's your opinion. I had a Bandit for years, and an FJ1200. The front brake is the brake that will stop you in a screaming emergency. If you have trained yourself that you have to use the rear brake in one, you're making a mistake. On a bike like the Bandit, the front will easily stoppie the bike. The rear is nice to use and it's a great tool. It's NOT emergency stopping power, the front is, and I stand by what I said. Many riders simply don't understand this and way overuse the rear brake.
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Old 09-25-2020, 06:52 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by cozy View Post
In my experience at least using this Bandit, it is totally false that the rear brake does or should only provide 5% of stopping power. Having now ridden with only a front brake to use for a short time, in no way is that a safe, practical & ideal way to ride.
It simply does not provide enough sensitive, reliable strong braking power to deal safely with all the random occurrences, obstacles, inattentive other drivers, etc that exist, and provide a safe space cushion so to speak. Especially if driving at freeway speeds. I managed it, but it was definitely with very modified, unideal riding.

Ive also read and heard the rear brake should provide around 30% of braking power, which in my experience is far more accurate to what is does and safely should contribute.
Apparently something is very wrong. I owned and rode a Bandit on the track and street, and that was not the case. If you think you can't get "strong" braking power with only the front, you're doing something incredibly wrong or you have brake problems. I've read that Jesus is coming back.

Parenthetically, the stock Bandit front springs are so soft that that may be your problem. Try to really haul the beast down at speed and the front end collapses. I had to revalve and respring my forks to get that thing safe.
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Old 09-25-2020, 09:26 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by afm199 View Post
That's your opinion. I had a Bandit for years, and an FJ1200. The front brake is the brake that will stop you in a screaming emergency. If you have trained yourself that you have to use the rear brake in one, you're making a mistake. On a bike like the Bandit, the front will easily stoppie the bike. The rear is nice to use and it's a great tool. It's NOT emergency stopping power, the front is, and I stand by what I said. Many riders simply don't understand this and way overuse the rear brake.
I stand by what I said. And yes, what you said is true. And you also said that the rear is nice to use and a great tool. I also agree with that as well.

When I talk about using the rear brake, I do mean always. But that also doesn't mean mindlessly mashing on the pedal. It means leaning to actually use it less as your front braking gets harder and harder. It means learning to use the front as hard as it can be without locking up the front wheel, PLUS learning to modulate and adjust the rear as it's effective braking force gets lower and lower as the front takes up more of that job. Eventually, having practiced enough, one learns this. And I think you can agree with this.
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Old 09-25-2020, 09:41 AM   #38
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It means learning to use the front as hard as it can be without locking up the front wheel, PLUS learning to modulate and adjust the rear as it's effective braking force gets lower and lower as the front takes up more of that job.
The new bikes have ABS (and traction control) so that even a ham fisted rider can get maximum braking without such careful modulation.

I take it personally whenever the ABS kicks in, since I should have the skills for proper braking near the limit. But I appreciate that it's there and works so well, especially in slippery conditions.
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Old 09-25-2020, 10:12 AM   #39
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I stand by what I said. And yes, what you said is true. And you also said that the rear is nice to use and a great tool. I also agree with that as well.

When I talk about using the rear brake, I do mean always. But that also doesn't mean mindlessly mashing on the pedal. It means leaning to actually use it less as your front braking gets harder and harder. It means learning to use the front as hard as it can be without locking up the front wheel, PLUS learning to modulate and adjust the rear as it's effective braking force gets lower and lower as the front takes up more of that job. Eventually, having practiced enough, one learns this. And I think you can agree with this.
Yes and no. The reason I stated it the way I did is that it takes years to learn to use the rear brake well. And in most instances, emergency braking occurs much more for new riders than experienced ones. Those are the ones that I want to understand that the front brake will stop them well and very quickly, and trying to use the rear brake will usually result in locking up the rear and the nasty slides that result. Those slides are the ones that scare the new riders and lead them to do really stupid things like "Laying the bike down."

You're a long time BARFer and someone with tons of experience, I agree with almost everything you post.
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Old 09-25-2020, 04:06 PM   #40
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Yes and no. The reason I stated it the way I did is that it takes years to learn to use the rear brake well. And in most instances, emergency braking occurs much more for new riders than experienced ones. Those are the ones that I want to understand that the front brake will stop them well and very quickly, and trying to use the rear brake will usually result in locking up the rear and the nasty slides that result. Those slides are the ones that scare the new riders and lead them to do really stupid things like "Laying the bike down."

You're a long time BARFer and someone with tons of experience, I agree with almost everything you post.
Again, I agree with you. However, it might be helpful, perhaps, if you were to mention that your advice is for new/newer riders and why. But yea.....learn to use the front brake. It's powerful and it really works. Only then work on the rear brake.
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Old 09-25-2020, 05:24 PM   #41
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Again, I agree with you. However, it might be helpful, perhaps, if you were to mention that your advice is for new/newer riders and why. But yea.....learn to use the front brake. It's powerful and it really works. Only then work on the rear brake.
Yeah, I for sure could have mentioned that. My bad.
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