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Old 05-30-2017, 03:31 PM   #76
alexmliguori
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Hi,

I recently passed the California motorcycle safety training successfully as well as the knowledge test for M1 license at the DMV, thus getting my motorcycle license.
I own a Honda CBR 500R.
However, I have no practice on motorcycles apart from the motorcycle safety training and therefore I need coaching to learn to ride my Honda safely and comfortably.

Can you recommend a motorcycle instructor to me who could be available to give me a few riding lessons in Palo Alto?

Thanks,
Alec
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Old 05-30-2017, 08:43 PM   #77
motomania2007
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Originally Posted by alexmliguori View Post
Hi,

I recently passed the California motorcycle safety training successfully as well as the knowledge test for M1 license at the DMV, thus getting my motorcycle license.
I own a Honda CBR 500R.
However, I have no practice on motorcycles apart from the motorcycle safety training and therefore I need coaching to learn to ride my Honda safely and comfortably.

Can you recommend a motorcycle instructor to me who could be available to give me a few riding lessons in Palo Alto?

Thanks,
Alec
A couple of suggestions:
Pacificmotorcycletraining.com in San Jose and South SF and 2wheelsafety.com in Newark and Santa Clara offer additional ride time programs where you can ride on their range bikes on their range with an instructor present to provide instruction for $50/hr.

I don't know their policies for sure but since your bike is under 500cc you can probably even use your own bike if you want to.

Another option is for you to ride your bike in a parking lot or quiet residential streets and just practice the basics you learned in class.

If I can help further, let me know.
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Last edited by motomania2007; 05-30-2017 at 08:44 PM..
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Old 05-31-2017, 09:09 PM   #78
LittleBigGirl
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A friend of mine used Moto Mike in SF to help get her going. He supplied a bike and she took a few private lessons. He then helped her get her bike and acquaint her with her own bike for a few sessions.

She got the confidence she needed and was on the Bay Bridge in just 5 sessions.

MotoMike -
http://www.learn2ridesafely.com/
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Old 06-03-2017, 12:15 PM   #79
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Originally Posted by openair View Post
Perhaps mandate that they be made aware, in explicit terms, of the dangers of what they are choosing to do when riding. But don't mandate that these courses be required for absolutely everyone. We can't put everyone in a bubble, we can't make everyone safer, and we can't even pretend that what we're doing to try and make them safer is actually working for everyone...nor should we. I suppose it really just comes down to a "freedom" argument in the end.
I agree everyone should be made aware, but the safety courses aren't mandated by anyone. They are there so people can voluntarily make themselves aware. As much as I think the DMV's M1 test is a far cry from testing our actual road-handling abilities, there has to be some sort of licensing process for everyone's safety, not just the motorcyclist's.

I don't think this is about "freedom" or the encroaching thereof. I feel very "free" to ride my motorcycle even without an M1.

I do agree that everyone learns differently, hence why the courses are not required.

I also agree that paragraphs are very handy.
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Old 07-05-2017, 04:44 AM   #80
openair
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I was more referring to the suggestion that was made earlier in the thread that these courses should be made mandatory.

As much as I think the courses are a great thing overall to experience and do not grudge them, every data point I've been able to find on the topic indicates that the courses do not statistically reduce motorcycle accidents nor related fatalities (if there is data that shows otherwise, and I just haven't seen it, then I will gladly eat these words). And since we can agree that the DMV test is not particularly meaningful, that leaves us with the individual being the real determinant of safety, regardless of course or no course. And that's ultimately the reality.

If the courses are made mandatory without proving their effectiveness, it does actually become a freedom thing (it's actually a freedom thing either way, but there's a logical argument for them to be mandatory if the courses reduce deaths and state costs), especially if a cop has the authority to impound your bike (which they have if you don't possess an M1 but are riding to a destination that requires the freeway).

Ultimately, if the mandatory licensing process (here we're talking about state mandated courses) doesn't actually empirically increase everyone's safety (regardless of whether or not it feels like it does), it is an unnecessary limitation on freedom and should remain voluntary. And even if it does increase safety, the question of whether we prioritize more safety or more freedom is still valid.
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Old 07-08-2017, 05:05 PM   #81
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To your point, I have just always had a hard time associating the freedom argument with situations where you can potentially harm others.

I'm all about live and let live, but the rider is not the only person to consider when it comes to safely riding a motorcycle. There are passengers, drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, etc. whom we also need to watch out for.

I'm going for wreckless, not reckless
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Old 07-08-2017, 06:13 PM   #82
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Small point to clarify:
The CMSP motorcycle safety course is mandatory for riders 20 years old and under.
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Old 07-08-2017, 06:18 PM   #83
stephanotis
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Small point to clarify:
The CMSP motorcycle safety course is mandatory for riders 20 years old and under.
Thanks for pointing that out, Enchanter!
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Old 07-08-2017, 10:58 PM   #84
openair
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Originally Posted by stephanotis View Post
To your point, I have just always had a hard time associating the freedom argument with situations where you can potentially harm others.

I'm all about live and let live, but the rider is not the only person to consider when it comes to safely riding a motorcycle. There are passengers, drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, etc. whom we also need to watch out for.

I'm going for wreckless, not reckless

I can understand this. I think one of the big problems I have with it being made mandatory is that the courses haven't proven effective in reducing rider accidents and fatalities. So it's really not solving the thing you're concerned about. The accidents are still happening at the same rate or higher (lots of articles on this, but I'm open to data I might not have seen). I would respect the possibility of these courses being required if they made a big dent in the statistics. I could understand the logical argument for it at that point, and that argument would be able to challenge my freedom argument by way of proving that it isn't an arbitrary requirement. But as long as they don't make a dent, it really starts to look arbitrary at the point when it is turned into a mandatory thing (there are people pushing to make them mandatory).

Also, from what I understand, CHP is planning to very soon use these courses as a sort of motorcycle traffic school, required after various motorcycle citations. I suspect the quality of the courses will be impacted (just think about regular traffic school and whether or not people find it helpful) if CHP starts funneling more and more people into these and they become an extension of government.

I'm with you on the safety thing. I just don't think we've found the solution to that.
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Old 07-08-2017, 11:50 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by openair View Post
I would respect the possibility of these courses being required if they made a big dent in the statistics. I could understand the logical argument for it at that point, and that argument would be able to challenge my freedom argument by way of proving that it isn't an arbitrary requirement. But as long as they don't make a dent, it really starts to look arbitrary at the point when it is turned into a mandatory thing
You've just made the point that the courses, in addition to needing to being mandatory, are data-proven to be insufficient and the level of proficiency required to obtain a license should be increased. (Note: the number of Squid organ-donors in countries requiring said proficiency-levels is FAR less than here.

I'm good with that. The Freedom thing is a straw-man argument.

Hell, I think you should have to pass an IQ test for a license to drive anything! Thankfully the autonomous cars are coming, I just hope they're priced at a level that even stupid people can afford one.

And Steph, with your approach and attitude, I think you're going to be a responsible rider.
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Old 07-09-2017, 12:30 AM   #86
openair
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The courses, as they exist today, seem to have little justification for being made mandatory. So I'm definitely not making that argument. But yeah if they were beefed up and then proven to reduce accidents and fatalities and associated state costs, the argument would be far more solid EXCEPT that a single set of courses are not the only way to become a good rider (many old-school riders I know have never taken a course), and that should ideally be acknowledged somehow.

I'm not sure I agree that the freedom thing is a straw man argument. Freedom is pretty much at the core of this. Otherwise we'd accept whatever as mandatory checkpoints before we could legally engage in an activity rather than discuss its need to provide a measurable benefit.

In any case, I don't need to keep pushing my view here. I appreciate everyone's viewpoints. This is just mine.
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Old 09-24-2020, 04:53 PM   #87
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Been there, done that... Dropped my bike (2009 BMWF800GS) trying to park it dammit! I'm an old fart and only weigh 145# (maybe 150 kitted out) and managed to pick up my beast of a bike. Only reason I was able to do it was I watched a couple of videos before I ever got on the bike, got over the "stoopid" I'd just done and righted the bike. So I got [I]that[I] particular bit of the moto "mystique" outta the way and it no longer intimidates me.
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Old 10-17-2020, 08:14 AM   #88
cellige
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You can always up your own control skills at any course, however dealing with other cars/traffic can really only be learned on the road. So just going to lower traffic roads and starting there is always a good bet.
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