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Old 05-05-2019, 03:34 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Lewd_Ferrigno View Post
On a two lane canyon road, the sharpness shouldn’t be that different, if at all.
The radius for a given turn is absolutely different if you're taking it as a right or going the other direction and taking it as a left. I think that's what Aware means by "sharpness."
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:10 PM   #32
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The radius for a given turn is absolutely different if you're taking it as a right or going the other direction and taking it as a left. I think that's what Aware means by "sharpness."
I’m talking Canyon road, where there aren’t sharp turns from a stop.

Your radius is set by the double yellow.

The roads are purposely designed for positive camber, as it assists in draining the road. The camber is more positive at the inside of the turn, effectively making the forces acting on the bike hold you in the turn.

Sharp is a perception.

I’ve also ridden on English roads. From a typical 90 degree street turn, the difference can be confusing.

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Old 05-05-2019, 05:21 PM   #33
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I’ve also ridden on English roads. From a typical 90 degree street turn, the difference can be confusing.
There's nothing confusing about it; it's a geometric certainty. Yes, camber can be a factor, but not all roads are crowned the way you describe.
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:29 PM   #34
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There's nothing confusing about it; it's a geometric certainty. Yes, camber can be a factor, but not all roads are crowned the way you describe.
You’re right again, as there are no variables introduced into that geometry. Everything is perfectly linear. Sound logic. As far as camber, sharp turns are way more likely to be positive camber, by design, in the mountains or canyons. It’s basic infrastructure design. What would be the net traffic effect of a negative camber turn on a mountainside?


And your contention is that, after having been taught to ride on one side of the road, your entire life, having to switch to the other side requires no brain training? Solid.

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Old 05-05-2019, 05:36 PM   #35
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I’m done. Sick of you jumping on every damn post. Later
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Old 05-06-2019, 01:53 PM   #36
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Look at the image in post #7 above. Imagine what the road looks like when you turn around and come back. That left-hand sweeper is no longer a tight turn, and you have a much easier time seeing around and through the turn. It is easier to take that turn faster from the other direction. And likely with greater lean.

Also

If I fuck up a right-hander by going in too fast, there's a good chance that I'll put myself into a head-on collision. If I do the same on a left-hander, I go into the weeds.

This and the reduced visibility, plus the very high likelyhood of cars pulling gravel into the turn mean that I approach blind right-handers with much more caution than left-handers.

If I can see ahead and through the turn (not a blind corner) then I turn the wick up. 8-)
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Old 05-07-2019, 08:14 AM   #37
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I might add to also read up and practice trail braking on those tight blind corners.
I use this along with late apex approach when riding unfamiliar tight roads with lots of blind corners.
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Old 06-05-2019, 07:28 AM   #38
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Either I missed it or it wasn't mentioned. One issue I have with right turns in canyons is if inside of the turn is a solid rock wall or other obstacles, like trees, preventing you from taking the inside line.
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Old 06-05-2019, 08:46 AM   #39
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Either I missed it or it wasn't mentioned. One issue I have with right turns in canyons is if inside of the turn is a solid rock wall or other obstacles, like trees, preventing you from taking the inside line.
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Old 06-05-2019, 01:13 PM   #40
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Either I missed it or it wasn't mentioned. One issue I have with right turns in canyons is if inside of the turn is a solid rock wall or other obstacles, like trees, preventing you from taking the inside line.
Making it a blind corner with gravel on the 'racing' line. Yeah that slows me down on right handers.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:34 AM   #41
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After riding for 20 years, I still hate right turns Wife is more comfy in them.
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Old 06-08-2019, 08:21 AM   #42
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THIS is a whole nother breed of riders....just amazing race is the Isle of Man.....on the bucket list to go see one of these
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Old 01-08-2020, 01:21 PM   #43
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When I rented a bike in New Zealand a few years ago, the guy specifically recommended practicing right-hand U-turns, since we so rarely need to do them in this country.

As far as SF is concerned, if you want to level-up your right-hand turning after a stop, you could do worse than practice turning right from 17th St. onto Roosevelt Way. Very tricky because the geometry of the turn and, especially, the topography.
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Old 01-25-2020, 07:34 AM   #44
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For the life of me I can never get comfortable with right hand turns in the mountains. Couple reasons. Most right hand turns are blind. If there is gravel in the road most likely that side. If you happen to low side then you slide into on coming traffic. I’ve been a motorcyclist for 10+ years and still can’t feel comfortable. Any advice you can give will be greatly appreciated.
Stop worrying, stop thinking. Turn with your chin and shoulders leaning towards the inside mirror. This manuever will help in turning in curves and in seeing beyond the turn. Take the turn outside-inside-outside. And practice in a parking lot initiating a turn, sitting up, and then emergency braking.

Better yet, take an intermediate riding course with the CMSP. I recommend Pacific Motorcycle Training. I took their IRC class recently and it taught me how much more I need to learn as a rider.
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Old 01-25-2020, 10:39 AM   #45
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I'm right handed and have always found R-turns uncomfortable. The theory I came up with is that subconsciously I'm guarding my dominate side. Some of the already stated makes sense to some and perhaps I'm full of it (ok, I'm full of it mostly). However, no one else mentioned this so I'm tossing it out there as I'm the same way on the track.
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