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Old 09-20-2020, 08:50 AM   #16
cozy
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Well,, last week a day after going back in to the motorcycle shop for both the squealing and to have the battery and switch parts I paid for installed, while i was riding on the freeway I applied the brakes as traffic suddenly slowed, but discovered suddenly i had zero rear brakes!!!

The rear brake lever just sank all the way down a bottomless pit with zero resistance! I managed to pull over to the shoulder of road, got off motorcycle and saw that one brake pad and its components had totally fallen out and the other rear brake pad was dangling precariously down almost totally out of caliper. Well, that was one unsuccessful rear brake installation to say the least!

I called the shop and they said they will repair it correctly this time, no extra charge to me. Still waiting on them to say they have all the parts and come in to get the work done correctly this time.
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Old 09-20-2020, 11:41 AM   #17
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Oh man. Glad you are alright and that the shop is making it right. I'd definitely consider never using them again.
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Old 09-20-2020, 11:54 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Free_Bird View Post
Normally as new Pads settle it causes a low volume scraping sound. Even worn Rotors have the same low volume scrape sound. Note it doesn't matter the rotor condition the sound is low volume.
Loud sounds indicate metal to metal scraping. With new brake pad it has to be incorrectly installed parts. There is metal shims, retaining springs and even a rotor not sandwiched properly between the pads.
Call the Shop and have it corrected. Don't have the rotor changed it is not the current problem.
If the Bike has 50k miles on it. Next time the Rear Tire is changed. Have them put a new Rotor installed.
While a metal to metal sound is indicative of a metal scraping sound, that's not always the case. For instance, on my Mini I run track pads on the street and sometimes they sound exactly like I wore the pad out and I'm running metal to metal.
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Old 09-20-2020, 01:46 PM   #19
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You are experiencing pad and disc harmonics... its a kin to front end
chatter... easy to diagnose but hard to cure... changing the thickness
of the pads also changes the harmonics ... harmonics come and go as
the pads thickness changes... it may disappear has the pads change
thickness due to wear or you can use a product like "Disc Brake Quiet"
between the pads and the pucks... This red or blue cream allows the
pads to vibrate against the puck without ringing the metal like a bell...

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Old 09-20-2020, 09:54 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by Busy Little Shop View Post
You are experiencing pad and disc harmonics... its a kin to front end
chatter... easy to diagnose but hard to cure... changing the thickness
of the pads also changes the harmonics ... harmonics come and go as
the pads thickness changes... it may disappear has the pads change
thickness due to wear or you can use a product like "Disc Brake Quiet"
between the pads and the pucks... This red or blue cream allows the
pads to vibrate against the puck without ringing the metal like a bell...

Or use this:

https://www.summitracing.com/parts/p...yABEgJyGvD_BwE

It's very thick and can handle extreme temps.
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Old 09-22-2020, 07:16 PM   #21
cozy
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Thanks for the tips.

Update :
The shop finally got the parts in and i rode back out to their sf shop for them to redo the rear brakes correctly this time. Hopefully so. The bottom of the rear brake caliper area now has a black metal base which was not there before. Seems it would prevent anything falling out, though of course it should be securely attached anyway.

While there when the mechanic test road the bandit after reinstalling brakes, he said it seems to run a bit rough. Stalled on him when he rode it. It does usually need some choke and run for a minute or so before riding without choke, if its sat for more than 45 minutes or so. He and the shop owners daughter ( i think they may be father - daughter ? ) said they suggest getting a full tune up, which costs a bit above $900! Seems incredibly high.? I happen to ask while i was there ( before they suggested the tune up ) if they could fit in an oil change with filter while there. I replaced the filter and oil around 7 months ago, but wasnt in mood to find a oem filter and do it myself at the moment.
They said it would be $170. At first I though they said $70, which seems reasonable. But $170 it is. I passed. Found an oem filter for under $30 about 6 blocks away and will buy oil and do it myself.

The attached image is a photo of the paper they gave me showing what they include in their full tune up.

Anyone recommend an honest, trustworthy quality and affordable motorcycle mechanic in the Marin, north bay area who can usually gt us in within a week.?
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Old 09-23-2020, 08:06 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by cozy View Post
Well,, last week a day after going back in to the motorcycle shop for both the squealing and to have the battery and switch parts I paid for installed, while i was riding on the freeway I applied the brakes as traffic suddenly slowed, but discovered suddenly i had zero rear brakes!!!

The rear brake lever just sank all the way down a bottomless pit with zero resistance! I managed to pull over to the shoulder of road, got off motorcycle and saw that one brake pad and its components had totally fallen out and the other rear brake pad was dangling precariously down almost totally out of caliper. Well, that was one unsuccessful rear brake installation to say the least!

I called the shop and they said they will repair it correctly this time, no extra charge to me. Still waiting on them to say they have all the parts and come in to get the work done correctly this time.
I encourage you to grasp the concept that braking a motorcycle is 95% front brake and 5% rear brake. I've almost never replaced rear brake pads in 60 plus years of motorcycling. They are a tack hammer. The front brake is a sledgehammer. Use tools appropriately. The rear brake is basically for traction impaired conditions, wet, grass, dust, sand, etc. Learn to depend on your front brake to save your life, and the rear for special situations.
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Old 09-23-2020, 08:16 AM   #23
Tom G
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Originally Posted by afm199 View Post
I encourage you to grasp the concept that braking a motorcycle is 95% front brake and 5% rear brake. I've almost never replaced rear brake pads in 60 plus years of motorcycling. They are a tack hammer. The front brake is a sledgehammer. Use tools appropriately. The rear brake is basically for traction impaired conditions, wet, grass, dust, sand, etc. Learn to depend on your front brake to save your life, and the rear for special situations.
I got a BMW R1200GS with the linked brakes. Only use the front. Have forgotten where the rear brake lever is. The rear pads still wear out eventually. ABS takes care of the rest, although in extreme rare cases.
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Old 09-23-2020, 10:07 AM   #24
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I always used both brakes, especially on a big bike. That way you're in the proper habit of using it. And I think that not using the rear brake is not a safe habit to get into.

However, yes the front brake is the most important. Depending upon how hard you're braking, it can be anywhere from 70% to 100% of your stopping power. But do NOT ignore the rear brake. That's the lazy man's approach to braking.
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Old 09-23-2020, 11:09 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by cozy View Post
Anyone recommend an honest, trustworthy quality and affordable motorcycle mechanic in the Marin, north bay area who can usually gt us in within a week.?
Not in the north bay, but I have had good luck with GP Sports in San Jose. They did the valves and an oil change on my bike for an hour of shop labor plus parts. I think the parts came out to be about 1.5x what I would have paid if I had purchased through Rocky Mountain ATV/MC. I set up an appointment with them, and I picked it up after one day in the shop.
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Old 09-23-2020, 12:39 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by ST Guy View Post
I always used both brakes, especially on a big bike. That way you're in the proper habit of using it. And I think that not using the rear brake is not a safe habit to get into.

However, yes the front brake is the most important. Depending upon how hard you're braking, it can be anywhere from 70% to 100% of your stopping power. But do NOT ignore the rear brake. That's the lazy man's approach to braking.
So I guess I'm the lazy brakeman, but I only own and ride one single bike, for the last almost 10 years. My ABS system is the diligent brakeman then.

I attended a class with the Alameda County Sheriff some time ago. One of the drills using front brake, rear brake, and both brakes with one of their beaters (no ABS). Using both brakes saved about 20% of the stopping distance.
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Old 09-23-2020, 04:37 PM   #27
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So, I’m not clear, do you use the rear brake?
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Old 09-23-2020, 08:21 PM   #28
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So, Iím not clear, do you use the rear brake?
Unless I turn the ABS off the linked brake from BMW automatically applies rear brake whenever I use the front brake. Small percentage only. I can still use my right foot to apply rear brake as well, which is then independent.
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Old 09-23-2020, 09:00 PM   #29
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Get in the habit of using and learning to modulate the rear brake with your foot. It may save your life one day. And in any case, will make you a better rider.
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Old 09-24-2020, 01:30 PM   #30
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In my experience at least using this Bandit, it is totally false that the rear brake does or should only provide 5% of stopping power. Having now ridden with only a front brake to use for a short time, in no way is that a safe, practical & ideal way to ride.
It simply does not provide enough sensitive, reliable strong braking power to deal safely with all the random occurrences, obstacles, inattentive other drivers, etc that exist, and provide a safe space cushion so to speak. Especially if driving at freeway speeds. I managed it, but it was definitely with very modified, unideal riding.

Ive also read and heard the rear brake should provide around 30% of braking power, which in my experience is far more accurate to what is does and safely should contribute.
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