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Old 11-22-2020, 10:05 AM   #16
davidji
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Originally Posted by raghav706 View Post
Found the socket at Lowe's but one of the nut is too tight and the wrench slips. Scratched some surfaces while trying to unsuccessfully loosen it.
Will take the bike to mechanic on Monday
The nut you circled is the jam nut, not the adjuster bolt. It looks like you rounded it off. How? What exactly did you do? What sequence of turning nuts & bolts, and what direction were you trying to turn them?

The photo may be deceiving but it looks like you were trying to tighten the jam nut--the near side of the top face looks rounded, as if you had an open wrench on it and pushed down too hard.
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Old 11-22-2020, 10:09 AM   #17
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The photo may be deceiving but it looks like you were trying to tighten the jam nut--the near side of the top face looks rounded, as if you had an open wrench on it and pushed down too hard.
The scratch on the swingarm below corroborates this. It looks like the wrench hit the swingarm there, after you stripped the face of the jam nut overtightening it.
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Old 11-22-2020, 12:25 PM   #18
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Yes, tightening jam-nut more will just lock it tighter. Want to spin it other way to loosen...

Use right-hand rule to determine direction of turning (applies to fasteners as well as to electromagnetism).

1. Wrap right hand around fastener - jam-nut in this case

2. with thumb aimed in direction you want fastener to move. In this case, start with wrist below swing-arm, fingers aimed up, thumb aimed towards back of bike

3. wrap fingers around fastener. Fingers point & aim in direction you want to spin fastener. So in this case, you want wrench to move from lower up to higher position to spin jam-nut towards back of bike.



This is really handy when you've got fasteners that aim in oddball directions where you can't crawl under to look at head of bolt or nut. Such as spoke-nipples and figuring which way to spin them. And the direction changes depending on whether you're looking at nipple at bottom of wheel vs. at top. Or oil-drain bolt from bottom of oil-pan. Many a professional mechanic have stripped oil-pan because of turning oil-drain bolt in wrong direction to remove.

Last edited by DannoXYZ; 11-22-2020 at 12:35 PM..
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Old 11-22-2020, 01:14 PM   #19
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Use right-hand rule to determine direction of turning (applies to fasteners as well as to electromagnetism).
I started to post the Right Hand Rule. That's a good illustration. People commonly use an utter garbage mnemonic for tightening/loosening, when the RH rule is simple and clear.

Applies almost everywhere. Exceptions I can think of are left bicycle pedal, and right side bicycle bottom bracket shell which both have left hand threads. And turnbuckles and some similar adjustment things, which have bits threaded each way.
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Old 11-22-2020, 06:49 PM   #20
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I have one - but you would have to come to Richmond - I have a lift as well. We would do the work here.
Thanks but I was able to fix it myself. Will keep you in mind next time
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Old 11-22-2020, 06:51 PM   #21
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Haha, you guys are too smart. I was turning in the wrong direction and rounded the nut
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Old 11-23-2020, 09:28 AM   #22
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Another easy way, is to set your ratchet for "off", then turn it in your hand. That's a help on upside down and hard to access bolts. That will tell you witch way to turn with your end wrench.
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Old 11-23-2020, 08:36 PM   #23
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Thanks but I was able to fix it myself. Will keep you in mind next time
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Old 11-23-2020, 08:38 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by davidji View Post
I started to post the Right Hand Rule. That's a good illustration. People commonly use an utter garbage mnemonic for tightening/loosening, when the RH rule is simple and clear.

Applies almost everywhere. Exceptions I can think of are left bicycle pedal, and right side bicycle bottom bracket shell which both have left hand threads. And turnbuckles and some similar adjustment things, which have bits threaded each way.
Also - 60's MOPAR lug nuts on one side (and I always used to forget which side)!!!
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Old 11-24-2020, 07:48 AM   #25
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Early Husqvarna counter shaft sprocket nut was left hand thread. I managed to break one off trying to loosen it. Also some mirrors on street bikes have one left hand thread, and one right hand thread.
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Old 11-24-2020, 07:56 AM   #26
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right hand mirror and bottom jam nut of shift lever adjuster on most jap bikes are left hand thread
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Old 11-24-2020, 09:47 AM   #27
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...some mirrors on street bikes have one left hand thread, and one right hand thread.
Yamaha is the one I know. IIRC it's left hand threads on the right side (brake lever perch) so both mirrors loosen when bumped.

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Also - 60's MOPAR lug nuts on one side (and I always used to forget which side)!!!
My 1st car was a mid-60s Dodge. I doubt I ever knew that, or ever removed a wheel. Could have gotten interesting...

My second car had knockoffs to attach the wheels, and the ones on the right side have LH threads, but they have arrows on them showing which way to knock them off.

As far as the bicycle pedal, they loosen fairly quickly on the wrong side. How do I know? I once installed a unicycle wheel backwards. Only figured it out after the pedals started working their way out. For a quick fix I pointed the seat in the other direction, until I had time to reorient the wheel.
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Old 11-24-2020, 10:56 AM   #28
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Yamaha is the one I know. IIRC it's left hand threads on the right side (brake lever perch) so both mirrors loosen when bumped.
Or in the case of several bikes that I bought new, so that the wind can loosen them. I can still remember riding my brand new 1997 Ducati Monster from Fresno back to Pleasanton and being unable to keep the lift mirror in place. I finally stopped at Carnegie when I was 80% home and borrowed a wrench from somebody there to tighten it up. The left mirror on my 790R came loose riding it home as well, but that was only about 15 miles, so not as big of deal.

I think the early 60's Pontiacs had reverse threads on the lug nuts on one side too.
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Old 11-24-2020, 11:13 AM   #29
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According to this guy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXxulZvCt_M

Chrysler was the last holdout to have reverse threads on the left side lug nuts. They were gone by 1975. He explains how it was a holdover from horse drawn carriages with a single center nut holding the wheel on. Can't find anywhere noting when all of the other car manufacturers switched, but quite a few other brands had them in the 50's.
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Old 11-24-2020, 01:45 PM   #30
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...Chrysler was the last holdout to have reverse threads on the left side lug nuts. They were gone by 1975. He explains how it was a holdover from horse drawn carriages with a single center nut holding the wheel on.
The weird thing is that with those central bolt systems on relatively modern cars, they were mostly threaded opposite the Chrysler lug bolts--no clue about carriages, but MG & Ferrari used LH threads on the right side for the central retaining bolt/knockoff. It may be a holdover, but the sides swapped somewhere.

Lotus apparently used LH threads on the left side knockoff, but their threads were cut differently, and they claimed it was correct. I'm not a mechanical engineer, but if the wheels didn't fall off, it works for me.
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