BARF - Bay Area Riders Forum

Go Back   BARF - Bay Area Riders Forum > Moto > Riding Skills


Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-02-2019, 06:32 AM   #16
NorCalBusa
Member #294
 
NorCalBusa's Avatar
 
Founding Member
Contributor

Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: .
Motorcycles: .
Name:
Methinks the key of stopping is to be balanced/ride it all the way to the stop- as if you planned to "hover" motionless. With some practice, don't even take your feet off the pegs until they go right to the ground, and then its not a wild stab to save a tip over- its off the peg and just straight down while staying vertical.

We've all seen the wild gesticulations of folks duck walking to a stop (and start), planting feet and they slide out- essentially using one's legs to stop, not the brakes and good technique. Balance first and always.
__________________
If you don't know where you are going, any road will take you there.
NorCalBusa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2019, 06:48 AM   #17
Frisco
Veteran
 
Frisco's Avatar
 
Contributor +

Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: El Cerrito
Motorcycles: Yammies Ď17 FZ-09 and '13 FJR
Name: Carl
Don’t look down, head and eyes up while you brake.
Frisco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2019, 07:52 AM   #18
clutchslip
Not as fast as I look.
 
clutchslip's Avatar
 
AMA #: 400179
Contributor ++xoxox++BB++++++!

Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Corkscrew-me-Carousel
Motorcycles: Ones faster than I can ride them.
Name: Skippy Dog
Squeezing the brake and gradually increasing pressure as needed. Gradually release the brake before a full stop.

You need to trust your bike's stopping ability, so you don't panic in an emergency and apply too much brake too quickly. That means practicing when it is safe and learn how long it takes to stop. You can flip over the handlebars on a modern sportbike because the brakes are that strong. The number of fingers probably doesn't matter - Rossi uses 4, Marquez uses 1. I'm a tweener and use 2 middle fingers. Practice.
__________________
"California: France's Retarded Cousin."
clutchslip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2019, 04:41 PM   #19
sportsluvr
Veteran
 
Contributor

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Cupertino
Motorcycles: One i'm still tryin to learn
Name:
Quote:
Originally Posted by superhawk View Post
How are you stopping the bike now? Front only? Rear only? Both? What is the bike doing now when you stop?
Front only. I mostly tend to engage front brakes too suddenly, leading to a jerky stop. Sometimes, it works well, meaning that I come to a gentle stop, which is what I want to see happen all the time.
sportsluvr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2019, 05:09 PM   #20
afm199
Veteran
 
afm199's Avatar
 
Mod Alumni
Founding Member
Top Percent Poster
Contributor +++++++++ +++++++++++++++++3%

Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Oaklamd
Motorcycles: Yamasuzhonaki 1450
Name: Mikezebub
The smoother you are, the smoother the stop is. IF you GRAB the front lever and JAM it on, you get a super bumpy, jumpy, stabby, crappy stop.

If you touch the lever with two fingers, squeeze it in a bit until the front pads contract the rotor, and then increase pressure, you get a smooth stop. Any sudden movement will translate into an upset bike.
__________________
That's not true! The lie is actually the truth! I know. Lots of people know this.
afm199 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 01:48 PM   #21
ST Guy
Veteran
 
ST Guy's Avatar
 

Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: South Bay
Motorcycles: Honda ST1100 ABS (tweaked here and there)
Name:
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmarklin View Post
ABS brakes. Thatís what the cops use.
ABS does nothing for stopping smoothly. ABS or not, one must learn to gradually release the brakes as the bike slows and approaches a stand still. It's all in modulating lever and pedal pressure.

Another skill is learning to shift smoothly so that one doesn't notice any jerk or jolt when shifting up or down. Essentially, making it seem as if you're riding a bike with a very smooth automatic transmission. You know that you've got it down when you can carry a passenger and the passenger can't tell you've shifted other than the sound of the engine.
__________________
It's not the answer that enlightens, but the question. - Eugene Ionesco

Let us not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless when facing them. - Rabindranath Tagore

A mind all logic is like a knife all blade. It makes the hand bleed that uses it. - Rabindranath Tagore
ST Guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 02:24 PM   #22
Caddywumpus
4N631
 
Caddywumpus's Avatar
 
AMA#: 2809543
Contributor
Roadside Angel

Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: The Grove
Motorcycles: Happy
Name: o'/<
I use 4 fingers and am plenty smooth yolo
__________________
The adventure is in the rider, not the bike.
Get Trained! www.goldenstatemoto.com
My dad used to own a Buell, until one day when he accidentally left his garage open overnight. Now he owns three.

Delay gratification and exercise financial responsibility, you say?
Why do you hate America?
RIP Mahito. 11/7/2010 AMA #2809543
Caddywumpus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 03:00 PM   #23
Blankpage
alien
 
Blankpage's Avatar
 
Contributor +++

Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: on assignment
Motorcycles: Once In a While
Name: Ay Caramba
Wish one finger could get the job done. Dispute radial calibers, master cylinder and brembos two fingers are needed.
Blankpage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 04:31 PM   #24
Beanzy
Wind free
 
Beanzy's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: The WC
Motorcycles: Huh?
Name:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportsluvr View Post
Front only. I mostly tend to engage front brakes too suddenly, leading to a jerky stop. Sometimes, it works well, meaning that I come to a gentle stop, which is what I want to see happen all the time.
As with anything that you want to get good at, you need to practice being firm yet gentle in your brake application.

The problem with only using the front brake in a panic situation is you might squeeze too hard and then wash out the front end. That's why paying attention to the front end on braking at different speeds and distances is important. The less up-and-down motion as you brake firmer and harder at longer distances or shorter times, the better your control of the bike.

And do add and practice with the rear brake. If both brakes are disc brakes, the stopping power will be evenly distributed fore and aft, and with practice you ought not to panic in a panic-inducing situation. As your reaction will be practiced, using mindful control.

Remember that even CHP motos and local agency motos, the conscientious ones anyway, practice their moto skills.
Beanzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 04:59 PM   #25
wheel_muse
bicycles 'n motos
 
wheel_muse's Avatar
 
Contributor +++++ GOP

Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central Contra Costa
Motorcycles: '18 Honda NC750XD
Name: Brian
In non-emergency hi speed braking I tend to apply rear first, to stabilize the bike. Add front brake for power. Use gear downshifts if appropriate. Eyes up, scanning, and forward.
wheel_muse is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 06:41 PM   #26
Beanzy
Wind free
 
Beanzy's Avatar
 

Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: The WC
Motorcycles: Huh?
Name:
The one thing that'll make you a smooth braker is ... anticipate what the asshole beside you, in front of you, and behind you will do.

So scan your mirrors. Be aware. And practice using your brakes every day. Because one day, being able to brake smoothly, quickly and hurriedly may save your life.

And when you have to make an emergency brake in traffic, do what cyclists do: shift your butt as far back on your seat as you brake front and rear.

Okay. My last two cents!
Beanzy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 07:22 PM   #27
East Bay Mike
Veteran
 
East Bay Mike's Avatar
 
Contributor

Join Date: May 2018
Location: Everywhere
Motorcycles: Homeless
Name: Chewbaccca
Quote:
Originally Posted by wheel_muse View Post
In non-emergency hi speed braking I tend to apply rear first, to stabilize the bike. Add front brake for power. Use gear downshifts if appropriate. Eyes up, scanning, and forward.
How interesting. In school I learned to apply the front brake first. Iíll test out your method in the same scenarios.

So for high speed emergency braking, always apply front brake first?
East Bay Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2019, 10:18 PM   #28
ZCrow
Veteran
 
ZCrow's Avatar
 
Contributor +

Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: San Francisco
Motorcycles: 07 GSXR 600 (track) & 09 Street Triple (street)
Name: Zack
I wouldn't.

Is the OP also, smoothly increasing pressure on the brake while gradually rolling off the throttle or just doing it like a car braking separately from throttle inputs.

Finishing, once slowed to a crawl with rear brake only and she would be able to balance for a second or two before putting your foot down.
ZCrow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2019, 09:08 AM   #29
sportsluvr
Veteran
 
Contributor

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Cupertino
Motorcycles: One i'm still tryin to learn
Name:
Thanks a lot folks for your feedback. I learnt a lot. I now need to practice using both brakes and take into account other valuable tips. Your feedback is much appreciated.
sportsluvr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2019, 09:10 AM   #30
sportsluvr
Veteran
 
Contributor

Join Date: May 2006
Location: Cupertino
Motorcycles: One i'm still tryin to learn
Name:
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZCrow View Post
I wouldn't.
Is the OP also, smoothly increasing pressure on the brake while gradually rolling off the throttle or just doing it like a car braking separately from throttle inputs.
No. I mostly use the front brakes using all fingers to boot! Got to change the way I apply brakes, and practice!
sportsluvr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 09:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.