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Old 02-05-2011, 10:24 PM   #16
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22 oz MSR Fuel bottle. I always have one in the case when I tour. It's good for about 12 miles on the FJR.

Pretty much any Army/Navy surplus has them as well as any backpacking/camping outfitter.

A 22oz runs about $19 and they are built to contain volatile fuels.

Make sure not to buy the shitty knock-offs that have become so popular for drinks. The knock-offs are designed to hold water, not explosives.
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:29 PM   #17
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Correct. The washer and end caps on the cheazy bottles are not designed to contact fuel so they disintegrate quickly and leak.

Nothing like riding around with a bomb waiting to go off in your backpack or tankbag!
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:34 PM   #18
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The MSR bottles won't open bouncing around in my trunk? Every water bottle has, even my Sigg.
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:38 PM   #19
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The MSR bottles won't open bouncing around in my trunk? Every water bottle has, even my Sigg.
Never seen it happen. That's one of the biggest differences in their construction. Deep, precision threads, and high quality O-rings that mate into the machined recesses of the cannister allow you to torque them down snugly and they never budge and they always come open when you want them to.

They are not toy water bottles, not even close.
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Old 02-05-2011, 10:52 PM   #20
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Nope they don't leak.. I've kept them in my backpack for weeks on end. I'd use it if i didn't need to do an emergency fill up maybe once a month or so just to keep it fresh.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:59 AM   #21
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The MSR bottles won't open bouncing around in my trunk? Every water bottle has, even my Sigg.
They shouldn't open, no, but I would suggest securing them somehow. Strap to the subframe, tie under the seat, adhere into the trunk. Some way of keeping a quart of gasoline from bouncing around all the time :|
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Old 02-06-2011, 08:20 AM   #22
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I can't imagine people are suggesting someone carry spare fuel in a separate bottle, no matter how secure, in an urban setting. You're heading out to cross a desert, then yeah, but...for everyday riding, this is what the "reserve" setting on the fuel petcock is for.

As others have mentioned, with a bit of experience you will learn to tell when the bike is about to run out, and you can reach down to the petcock and switch it to reserve without even slowing down. It's a skill pretty much all motorcyclists had "back in the day," but nowadays with EFI the fuel reserve has been replaced by the low fuel warning light (as long as you can see it...sometimes, in strong light...). And yes, the trip odometer is very useful.

One thing I never did understand...my early 80s Japanese bikes had fuel gauges, and pretty accurate ones, too...my modern bike doesn't...hmmm.
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:08 PM   #23
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I can't imagine people are suggesting someone carry spare fuel in a separate bottle, no matter how secure, in an urban setting. You're heading out to cross a desert, then yeah, but...for everyday riding, this is what the "reserve" setting on the fuel petcock is for.

As others have mentioned, with a bit of experience you will learn to tell when the bike is about to run out, and you can reach down to the petcock and switch it to reserve without even slowing down. It's a skill pretty much all motorcyclists had "back in the day," but nowadays with EFI the fuel reserve has been replaced by the low fuel warning light (as long as you can see it...sometimes, in strong light...). And yes, the trip odometer is very useful.

One thing I never did understand...my early 80s Japanese bikes had fuel gauges, and pretty accurate ones, too...my modern bike doesn't...hmmm.
Yeah, all I've got is a fuel light. God forbid that malfunctions or just dies. This might be handy since some modern bikes don't have reserve tanks.
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:20 PM   #24
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I can't imagine people are suggesting someone carry spare fuel in a separate bottle, no matter how secure, in an urban setting. You're heading out to cross a desert, then yeah, but...for everyday riding, this is what the "reserve" setting on the fuel petcock is for.

As others have mentioned, with a bit of experience you will learn to tell when the bike is about to run out, and you can reach down to the petcock and switch it to reserve without even slowing down.
Good sir, please educate us on how exactly you expect brand new riders with no experience to magically have a bit of experience?

Until you have experience, odds are pretty damn good you're going to run out of gas at one point or another, and pushing your bike a few miles just plain sucks. Hell, I got stranded way up in the mountains once when I was still pretty new. Was I glad I just happened to have 16oz of injector cleaner in my backpack? You bet.

(Did my bike run well? Hell no. But it got me out of miles of steep mountain roads at a time when nobody else was driving)
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Old 02-06-2011, 08:32 PM   #25
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Good sir, please educate us on how exactly you expect brand new riders with no experience to magically have a bit of experience?

I agree. Hell even some of us well experienced folks.. Screw up, and forget about the damn petcock mode, and how much fuel is in the tank.


Thankfully, my hayabusa has a very false "empty" level. Mine reads mid red to E, when it's got about a gallon left.
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Old 02-06-2011, 08:44 PM   #26
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Never seen it happen. That's one of the biggest differences in their construction. Deep, precision threads, and high quality O-rings that mate into the machined recesses of the cannister allow you to torque them down snugly and they never budge and they always come open when you want them to.

They are not toy water bottles, not even close.
+1. they arent designed just to store petroleum products... they are designed to survive outdoors sports that are hard on gear. ive dropped my MSR bottle off a 40ft cliff onto granite by accident. as a rock climber, i felt shameful, but the bottle barely dented and its not like the white-gas inside didnt work on my stove.

it is a little comical to think about carrying one of these on an MC. itd never fit in the "trunk" on my 600RR, but i may think about putting one in my pack next time i take a really really long trip. if i had a dual sport, id use it for MC camping trips since my stove runs on any petroleum fuel hehe.
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Old 02-06-2011, 09:57 PM   #27
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oooo good idea with those bottles. Now I might make the trip from Mines road to the end of del puerto canyon
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Old 02-07-2011, 06:54 AM   #28
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When I was commuting, a few times every week, bike sputters at 85mph with cars on my ass, flip to reserve, crack the throttle, go.

The trip meter was broken too.
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Old 02-07-2011, 07:53 AM   #29
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I agree. Hell even some of us well experienced folks.. Screw up, and forget about the damn petcock mode...

Or children screwing around with it switch it to reserve.


I learned of this on the Bay Bridge.


I still don't think I'd regularly carry around a bottle of fuel though.
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Old 02-07-2011, 08:10 AM   #30
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I've seen those around. Those would be SUPER handy to carry. Just don't mistake it for a water bottle
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