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Old 11-04-2019, 09:35 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by clutchslip View Post
Squeezing the brake and gradually increasing pressure as needed. Gradually release the brake before a full stop.

You need to trust your bike's stopping ability, so you don't panic in an emergency and apply too much brake too quickly. That means practicing when it is safe and learn how long it takes to stop. You can flip over the handlebars on a modern sportbike because the brakes are that strong. The number of fingers probably doesn't matter - Rossi uses 4, Marquez uses 1. I'm a tweener and use 2 middle fingers. Practice.
This exactly.

Too many people continue to increase or hold full pressure until they come to a full stop. You have to feather the brakes, releasing them as you approach the full stop with barely any pressure when you do hit full stop. It just takes practice and an awareness of how to achieve your goal.

I do the same thing in a car, I don't want you to know when the car comes to a complete stop if your eyes are closed, that's what I strive for.
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Old 11-05-2019, 12:37 PM   #32
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Ride a bike with shitty brakes.
Spend some years on old British bikes?
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Old 11-05-2019, 01:44 PM   #33
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Old 11-06-2019, 08:59 AM   #34
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No. I mostly use the front brakes using all fingers to boot! Got to change the way I apply brakes, and practice!
Then that is the key to smooth stops for you. It is similar to trail braking in that on a motorcycle, you gradually reduce or increase throttle while gradually reducing or increasing brake pressure. It is never an either or. So as you slow down, you gradual roll off the throttle while gradually increasing brake pressure. When you do it right, your bike doesn't dive/dip and you come to a smooth stop.
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Old 11-06-2019, 11:22 AM   #35
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So as you slow down, you gradual roll off the throttle while gradually increasing brake pressure.
When you say 'roll off', you mean loosen your grip on the throttle or slowly throttle down? If the latter, I tried(in the garage just now) to imagine how I'd do it in practice(throttling down while slowly increasing pressure on the brake lever), but that seems counter-intuitive although that is how it needs to be.
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Old 11-06-2019, 12:36 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by sportsluvr View Post
When you say 'roll off', you mean loosen your grip on the throttle or slowly throttle down? If the latter, I tried(in the garage just now) to imagine how I'd do it in practice(throttling down while slowly increasing pressure on the brake lever), but that seems counter-intuitive although that is how it needs to be.
One way it is sometimes taught is to maintain grip on the throttle with thumb, palm and ring and pinkie fingers, while curling index and BARF fingers over the brake lever. In a coordinated motion, roll the throttle off while squeezing brake lever to add pressure.
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Old 11-06-2019, 03:50 PM   #37
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As with anything that you want to get good at, you need to practice being firm yet gentle in your brake application.

The problem with only using the front brake in a panic situation is you might squeeze too hard and then wash out the front end. That's why paying attention to the front end on braking at different speeds and distances is important. The less up-and-down motion as you brake firmer and harder at longer distances or shorter times, the better your control of the bike.

And do add and practice with the rear brake. If both brakes are disc brakes, the stopping power will be evenly distributed fore and aft, and with practice you ought not to panic in a panic-inducing situation. As your reaction will be practiced, using mindful control.

Remember that even CHP motos and local agency motos, the conscientious ones anyway, practice their moto skills.
Incorrect. You don't want stopping power distributed evenly. The front discs have 90% of the stopping power, the rear disc 10%. Ideally you'll use some rear, or not. But you most definitely don't want to find some strange balance that loses 50% of your stopping power.

If you need to stop right NOW, the front, except in compromised traction, is how it is done.

Fronts wash out because of compromised traction.
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Old 11-06-2019, 03:51 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by moto-rama View Post
Spend some years on old British bikes?


Remembering racing Nortons, squeezing the front with all my might, pushing the rear pedal with all my weight, and considering whether or not to drag a foot help it slow down.
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Old 11-06-2019, 05:21 PM   #39
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Remembering racing Nortons, squeezing the front with all my might, pushing the rear pedal with all my weight, and considering whether or not to drag a foot help it slow down.
Maybe Norton, BSA, Triumph etc thought brakes were optional, like starting up?

You can always spot a old Brit rider, by the over-developed right leg.
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Old 11-06-2019, 06:45 PM   #40
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front tires often slide in an emergency stop because the brake application was too sudden. the tire tries to stop before the weight of the moto/rider can push it into the ground, before the tire is loaded. this is the main reason why a smooth brake application is absolutely necessary. also, too quick of a brake application will cause the forks to compress further. if you bottom the forks, you are reducing tire grip - which can also cause a slide. dont slam the brake, apply it.

applying the rear brake first absolutely will allow a motorcycle to stop quicker. the CG lowers, which allows more front brake to be applied. however, this is when everything is perfect including timing. in an emergency situation, you might not want to take the extra time to think about applying the rear brake first.
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Old 11-06-2019, 06:49 PM   #41
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front tires often slide in an emergency stop because the brake application was too sudden. the tire tries to stop before the weight of the moto/rider can push it into the ground, before the tire is loaded. this is the main reason why a smooth brake application is absolutely necessary. also, too quick of a brake application will cause the forks to compress further. if you bottom the forks, you are reducing tire grip - which can also cause a slide. dont slam the brake, apply it.

applying the rear brake first absolutely will allow a motorcycle to stop quicker. the CG lowers, which allows more front brake to be applied. however, this is when everything is perfect including timing. in an emergency situation, you might not want to take the extra time to think about applying the rear brake first.
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Old 11-06-2019, 07:17 PM   #42
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at the track, I think inexperienced riders have a very hard time building brake pressure. on a sport bike with quality tires, if that rear tire isnt almost off the ground and the forks arent close to bottom, you arent pulling the lever hard enough. it doesnt take more than 2 fingers with quality pads, but it does take some conscious effort to actually pull the lever. given that braking is 1/5th as strong on the street normally, I wouldn't be surprised if most riders deal with this. hell, thats exactly where most track riders learned to brake so lightly.

as an exercise - pull the lever smoothly, notice that u arent out of control, then pull the lever harder. keep pulling harder until you start to feel things going poorly or you are just about stopped. if you feel the rear tire getting light or some light vibrations from the front end, back off the lever just a touch. now uve found your max braking.
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Old 11-10-2019, 02:23 PM   #43
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When you say 'roll off', you mean loosen your grip on the throttle or slowly throttle down? If the latter, I tried(in the garage just now) to imagine how I'd do it in practice(throttling down while slowly increasing pressure on the brake lever), but that seems counter-intuitive although that is how it needs to be.
Slowly roll down. If you have a habit of keeping to fingers on the brake it is a pretty natural motion. The two fingers increase pressure on the brake lever while you palm and thumb slow roll off the throttle off. If you think about the movement of the palm of your hand prompts either increasing or decreasing pressure on the brake level because when you increase throttle you are moving your hand clockwise towards your body, increasing the distance between your fingers and the brake level and as you roll off the throttle you are shortening the distance between your palm and the brake lever. Both motions reinforce the action of either increasing or decreasing pressure on the brake lever. It feels very natural when you get in the practice of it.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:04 PM   #44
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Regarding the smooth application of the brakes, the Yamaha Champions Riding School video on "loading the tire before working the tire" comes highly recommended.


youtu.be/Fy1AIAc76Qo

I picked up "don't surprise the tire" somewhere and that's been pithy enough to stick.

Last edited by nichov; 11-12-2019 at 11:06 PM..
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Old 11-13-2019, 08:10 AM   #45
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I picked up "don't surprise the tire" somewhere and that's been pithy enough to stick.


I DO like that.
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